Vehicle Maintenance Checklist For Summer

Make sure your Vehicle is in top condition for Summer. As the weather gets warmer Toyota of El Cajon wants to make sure you take several simple precautions to keep your family safe before hitting the road this summer! We put together a quick and easy maintenance check list so you can prepare to enjoy your Summer!Image

Follow this Checklist to care for your vehicle this Summer!

  • 1.Change the Oil and Air Filter– Get an oil change every 3,000 to 5,000 miles. If you live in a mild climate or will be towing a trailer, a higher viscosity oil might be necessary. 
  • 2. Check Belts and Hoses -Inspect your belts and hoses for cracks, leakage or swelling. Summer heat will only make these conditions worse, and might cause a breakdown. 
  • 3. Check Fluids -Besides the oil, make sure all fluids are at proper levels. Take a look at the condition of your coolant, If necessary, add coolant or perform a flush-and-fill. 
  • 4. Check your Battery– Test your battery. Summer can be more demanding on your battery. Bring your vehicle in to our service department for a Free battery inspection. 
  • 5. Check the A/C -Assess your air conditioning system’s performance. If it fails to give you the usual relief, you might need to add refrigerant. Or, see if there’s another cause, such as a leak. 
  • 6. Check Your Brakes– Make sure that your brake pads are not running thin and replace damaged rotors and drums. 
  • 7.Check Tires –Before you hit the road, check your tires. Make sure they have enough tread. You can check tire wear by sticking a penny upside down between the tread. If you can see Lincoln’s head, it’s time for new tires. Also make sure to check the air pressure as well. Big temperature swings can cause your tires to lose pressure more quickly.

Helping Teens Hit the Road Safely!

Earning a driver’s license is a big step for your teen and for you. Its a time for new adventures and a spirit of freedom and it also a time for increased responsibility, and trust on both sides. Toyota provides families with tools to help keep their teen safe on the road. Arrive In Style is a campaign with Teen Vogue to promote safe driving among teenage girls. Toyota conducted a study, with the University of Michigan and it shows a significant correlation between parent and teen driving behaviors. Here are a few of the findings;

  • What Teens Think Their Parents Do Behind the Wheel Matters More Than What Parents Say They Do:   What teensthink  their parents do while driving has a greater impact on the teens’ behavior than what parents actually report they do.
    • If a teen thinks that his or her parent looks for something in the vehicle while driving, the teen is four times (4.1) more likely to also look for something while driving (as compared to if the teen does not think their parent does this at all).
    • If a teen’s parent reports looking for something in the vehicle while driving, the teen is two times (2.2) more likely to do the same (as compared to if the parent does not report this behavior at all).
    • If a teen thinks that his or her parent eats or drinks while driving, the teen is three times (3.4) more likely to likely to do the same (as compared to if the teen does not think their parent does this at all).
    • If a teen’s parent reports eating or drinking while driving, the teen is two times (2.2) more likely to do the same (as compared to if the parent does not report this behavior at all).
    • If a teen thinks that his or her parent deals with passenger issues while driving (interacts with passengers regarding requests, concerns and conflicts), the teen is five times (4.7) more likely to do so themselves (as compared to if the teen does not think their parent does this at all).
    • If a teen’s parent reports dealing with passenger issues while driving, the teen is two times (1.7) more likely to do the same (as compared to if the parent does not report this behavior at all).

To take a deeper look at the findings, click here. When it comes to your teen’s driving, you aren’t just a disciplinarian; you are a partner, mentor and role model. With the right information and plenty of parental involvement, you can both breathe easier when your teen takes the wheel.

Take the Pledge to be safe and have the chance to be featured in an upcoming issue of Teen Vogue! 

To join the movement and take the pledge visit the Arrive in Style site.

Toyota’s Kid Friendly Camatte57s Concept.

Toyota plans to debut their two new versions of the Camatte at the International Tokyo ImageShow this weekend. Both Versions: the Camatte57s and Camatte57s Sport feature detachable body panels and re-configurable pedals that children can operate while their parents Steer.

Both cars are all-electric “Camatte” is the Japanese for word for “care.” According to the automaker, it’s intended to signify both caring for others and caring for cars, while the lone ‘s’ at the end of each name stands for “touch,” and the number of body panels. corresponds to the number

Watch a team of Toyota engineers install body panels on a Camatte57s

Customer Reaches 500,000 Miles!

 Toyota of El Cajon’s customer Corky Patterson Reaches 500,000 miles in her

Image1992 Toyota Pick-up. 500,000 miles, is extremely unusual for a vehicle. While the material an engine is made out of, how well it’s built and how it’s driven all affect how long the engine will last, engine longevity usually comes down to one thing: maintenance.Image

Toyota of El Cajon spends on average $2k a year per technician on training and certifications. They receive training directly from the manufacturer, Toyota of El Cajon, and off-site classroom. They use the latest equipment and diagnostics.

Toyota of El Cajon’s technicians understand the nuances of combustion and what keeps a vehicle in peak operating shape.